News RSS



On a Mission to Make Textiles Circular

As you might have noticed, there’s a new section on our website called “Make textiles circular!”. Just like the concept of the circular economy, we’re on a mission to make the textile industry circular. As part of the European Union’s aim of achieving a climate-neutral economy by 2050, the circular economy package that the European Union adopted in 2018 has set out that all member states must collect textile waste separately by 2025. Even if the circular model might seem challenging at first, in comparison to the linear option of produce-consume-disregard, it is the most rewarding and environmentally friendly option. What’s more, it’s not that heavy on your wallet, either! Therefore, together with the European Commission Representative in Estonia, the...

Continue reading



The President of Estonia Kersti Kaljulaid's Dress Is a Statement for Sustainability

Last Thursday, on the Estonian Restoration of Independence day, the President of Estonia Kersti Kaljulaid decided to make a clear statement. This time not only through her speech, but through fashion. Simply by choosing to wear a locally upcycled dress - for the planet. The dress is designed by Reet Aus and made entirely out of production residues from the President’s previously worn dresses.  Our third collaborative dress for the President values upcycling and nature conservation by being made out of production leftovers. The design is inspired by the “Estonian Nature” esquise drawn by the children at Pelguranna kindergarten in Tallinn. The colours express nature - the greenness of the plants, the light blue sky above and the deep blue...

Continue reading



Quality-Oriented Consumer as the Driving Force of the Economy

The nature of consumer behavior during and after the crisis determines which products and services will be available in Estonia in the future. But not only that. Consumer choices affect innovation. This applies to fashion and every other industry. Every crisis is both a threat and an opportunity. One thing is clear, something will change. In the last three decades, our society has emerged victorious from all the crises affecting Estonia. As a result of the last crisis, the Estonian economy focused heavily on the ICT sector, but this time the key could be to concentrate our efforts on the production and consumption of sustainable, high-quality products. The Estonian people exited from the world’s largest empire during its governing crisis...

Continue reading



We Make Sustainability Affordable

  We have always prioritised the sustainability of the Planet and Mankind. Our academic background enabled to study the industry deeply for maximising sustainability and produce only from leftovers. It empowered us to develop the UPMADE® certification. But this is clearly not enough to change the industry. We’ve been rethinking and evaluating our business model. This has caused changes. We swiped retailers out from our pipeline. Why? Our products weren’t competitive enough. Despite our customers belonging into the LOHAS (i.e. lifestyle of health and sustainability) segment, that prioritises the sustainability of the Planet and Mankind, they also prioritise the sustainability of their wallet. LOHAS is a homo economicus. Let’s face the calculations. An average person in Europe makes about 1500-2000...

Continue reading



Recycling

As you all know, our main focus is on upcycling – globally and locally. However, we also recycle on a smaller scale, to help tackle the blight of textile waste in every way possible. Many people don’t know the difference between upcycling and recycling. Upcycling is a process which creates a product of higher value than the original, and recycling is when you use waste as material to manufacture a new product. The latter is what we will be focusing on in this blog post.  According to the European Commission’s report “Towards an EU Product Policy Framework contributing to the Circular Economy”, recycled materials only account for around 1% of all materials used in textile production. It’s a surprisingly small...

Continue reading